Functional RNAomics laboratory

The Functional RNAomics laboratory studies gene regulation via RNA processing. By determining how RNA regulation is orchestrated in different cell types, we aim to crack the cellular RNA code and gain critical insights into how aberrations in the RNA machinery result in genetic disorders and cancer.

RNA is emerging as a powerful and easily adaptable therapeutic molecule as exemplified by the rapid development of effective mRNA vaccines but a detailed knowledge of RNA regulation in cells is a prerequisite to realise the full potential of RNA-based therapeutic and diagnostic development. We integrate cell biology approaches with mechanistic studies, global mapping of RNA repertoires, RNA binding protein interactions and proteomics profiles to reveal the functional role of RNA-protein complexes in different cell lineages and in disease. One of our current research focuses is the role of dysregulated RNA processing in colorectal cancers currently incurable. The ultimate goal of the team is to improve human health through innovative applications of RNA biology.

Associate Professor Minni Änkö obtained her PhD from the Åbo Akademi University in Finland. She was a post-doctoral fellow at the Max Planck Institute of Cell Biology and Genetics, in Dresden, Germany 2006-2011. Minni moved to Australia in 2011, and worked as a visiting scientist at the Australian Regenerative Medicine Institute, Monash University. She then continued her research as a senior research fellow at the Walter and Eliza Hall Institute (2012-2013) until establishing her laboratory at the Monash University in 2014 and relocating to the Hudson Institute of Medical Research in 2018. Minni joined Tampere University as a tenure track professor in January 2022. Her research on Functional RNAomics continues in Tampere. She also holds an appointment at the Hudson Institute in Melbourne.

Orcid: https://orcid.org/0000-0003-0446-3566